Weeknote 4

I almost forgot to write a weeknote this week. I guess I need to write it down in the ToDo list!

WORK

Classes are settling down. We’re almost out of the theoretical section of the readings, which is worthwhile but quite abstract and demanding, and into the problem/case parts. I’ve gotten a better handle on integrating contemporary examples with the theory in the Privacy class and it’s working better. After four weeks both classes are settling into a rhythm. The Protest class has been easy from the start, but Privacy has had more bumps. But I’m more comfortable now and they are too, I think.

I spent my “free” time reading scholarship files for a program that gives a select group of students a full ride. It’s designed for students who are research focused, and program has undergone some changes over the last few years thanks to the admissions office wanting more control. As administrative tasks go, this one is very rewarding.

READING/WATCHING/LISTENING

I’ve fallen into the Midsomer Murders vortex and can’t get out. Pluto TV, which is essentially like a basic cable package but streaming, has binge channels of all kinds. We’ve become almost completely turned off by TV news, even of the BBC and PBS variety, and sports are mostly not available in the evening (we don’t watch much hockey or basketball until the playoff rounds). I chanced on a Midsomer Murders episode and it was kind of fun to revisit it. The best part for me, aside from the regular cast, are the excellent guest stars. Roger Allam as a no-good speculator. Anna Massey as a dangerously mad old spinster. Jenny Agutter as a still-lovely older woman whom too many many are attracted to. And so on. I think I’m close to burning out, though. There are only so many times I can hear that theme song.

I’m still reading the same books, so not much to report there. I haven’t been able to settle down and just read this week, hence the TV bingeing. I think the political news is finally getting to me. Iowa, WTF? Actually, I don’t have to ask, it’s pretty clear to see what happened. When you have inexperienced people designing complicated methods to operate complicated voting process you have clusterfucks waiting to happen. I think this piece on how the Iowa and Nevada contracts were an example of grift is spot on. This is not the time to be experimenting with untested systems by people whose connections rather than skills got them the contracts. The Democrats could easily lose this election to someone who never should have been elected once, let alone twice, all because they prefer the circular firing squad and drinking from the trough to fixing a badly broken system. There are few good options and they seem to be losing out to the not-good ones so far.

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