ReaderWriterVille

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Weeknote 15

It’s almost fall, and the weather is already there. Now if the mosquitoes and biting flies would just take a hike, it would be perfect.

It was a “normal” week. TheH has his teaching routine down and my second class finally got going, so where we are is where we’ll be until Thanksgiving week, at least we will be if we don’t get shut down again. So far, so good; our Covid dashboard is not exploding. But we’re only partway through testing all the students.

WORK

I thought that campus would be busier once all the students came back, but it still feels pretty empty. Not as bad as before classes started, but with so many classes online and all the requirements of distancing and spacing if you do come to campus, there aren’t a lot of incentives to be present. From what I can tell everyone is adhering to the rules when on campus. I’ve heard stories of parties and gatherings off-campus, like every other school, but if they cause infections to spike it will take a while to show up in the numbers.

Work is pretty routinized at this point. I go in twice a week and teach from my office, which is easier and quieter, but there’s not really much to report. Everything is done via video-conferencing, even meetings with people who are local, because we’re not supposed to meet in person except when necessary. If you want to hold meetings outside you have to sign up for one of the designated spaces. It’s all in aid of abundant caution and effective contact tracing, I imagine, but it discourages anything spontaneous.

READING/WATCHING/LISTENING

One of my new-release library holds came in and I managed to finish the book in less than a week. It was Red Pill by Hari Kunzru. I really enjoyed White Tears a couple of years ago, and this one was not quite as good but well worth reading. The narrator is a writer who goes to Berlin on a three-month residency at a center/retreat, but he still can’t find a way to write and he winds up becoming caught up in intrigues about privacy, stories about surveilled life in East Germany, and crackpot alt-right theories about how the world works. He slowly loses his grip and the novel spirals into something even less grounded in the last third or so, but then returns to reality at the end. It’s a hard book to describe without giving away the whole storyline. It doesn’t quite succeed in what it’s trying to do, and Kunzru has as hard a time writing about the alt-right as most non-alt-right authors, but he is so smart and writes so well and in such an interesting way that I was swept along on the ride. As with White Tears, I continued to think about the novel and its ideas after I had finished.

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Weeknote 14

Hello again. It’s been a while. Labor Day has come and gone, the university is fully starting back today, and we’re all holding our breaths to see if we can finish what we begin.

I spent most of my work time over the last two months preparing to teach my two classes. I took an online course to get more ideas on how to teach online courses, we drove to California without the dogs and spent three weeks, and we saw a handful of friends at a distance. Sometimes the days flew by and sometimes they took forever. But here we are.

WORK

I started my law school class three weeks ago. It’s fully remote, with at least half the students in different time zones, so I teach at 8am, which is the earliest I’ve ever met a class. I can’t say I enjoy teaching that early, but it does leave me with a lot of the teaching day free. So far it’s gone well. There was a lot of throat-clearing and introductory material in the first two weeks, because the students are new to the program and university and they’re missing the usual orientation activities. So we spend some time talking about non-class things. But they seem eager to get going and to learn.

I start my department grad class this week, finally, along with everyone else teaching in the parts of the university that were on the delayed timetable. The class is scheduled as a hybrid, with both in-person and remote attendance, but so far the majority of the students have informed me they’ll be remote. I have a feeling it’s going to wind up fully remote, but you never know. Both classes are synchronous, which means that while I have activities and assignments that try to compensate for not being in person, we’re still meeting as a class for the usual times. The main thing I want to figure out is how to get them to talk to each other outside class, since building cohort solidarity provides important resources in graduate school.

I had all kinds of plans for asynchronous pedagogy: narrated slides, podcasts, and of course the always recommended and mostly despised discussion boards. But the nature and purpose of my classes are such that student interaction is at least as important as what they learn individually. So I’m dialing back the out of class activities to focus on making the class a jumping off point for them to work together more.

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Weeknote 13 (and hiatus)

We had a very nice trip to Colorado. It was good to get to go beyond the Outer Ring freeway for the first time in 3 months.

RRW is going on hiatus for a while. I am finding the internet an increasingly unpleasant place to be in the current environment. You’d think when your world has shrunken to the extent ours has that having a window into a bigger world would be helpful. But there’s too much chaff to find the wheat, at least for me. Being outside, talking (virtually or otherwise) to people, spending time doing productive things, just seem like better options. I have Fall2020 classes to prepare, for which I can access help that doesn’t come with complaints and angst as part of the package. I am knitting. I am reading, fitfully. I am writing, slowly. We cleaned up our bicycles and have been tooling around the neighborhood and campus. Rowing in the basement is better than I expected (and the treadmill is bearable). The tomatoes are coming in thick and fast. The kale hasn’t turned bitter yet. It’s very hot and humid, but that’s STL in July for you.

I don’t know how long I’ll stay away; probably at least through the summer and maybe until after Election Day. Stay safe, everyone, and good luck getting through this.

Weeknote 12

I just realized that the Weeknote number corresponds to the number of weeks since we entered self-isolation, which turned into stay-at-home, which has turned into The Way We Live Now.

I feel as if I should say something about the protests, riots, police brutality, etc., but there are so many people talking about it. Yes, it is my line of work, that is, I teach, research, and write about it, but I’m not sure I have much to say that is original at the moment, certainly not off the top of my head. I’ve been reading and thinking about it all the time, though, so maybe I’ll write something when I’ve worked through some of my thoughts.

In terms of our immediate situation, St. Louis and its suburbs have seen a lot of protest events and a few riots. We have been under curfew (9pm-6am) since Tuesday night, and there is no set end date. Nonviolent protests continue, scattered throughout the city neighborhoods as well as in various suburbs. Some of the protests have been organized by high-school students and teachers, which is heartening. The day protests have blocked roads for brief times, but there hasn’t been a lot of conflict. Our closest commercial neighborhood, which was the site of major protests and conflict in 2017, has most of its windows boarded over, which makes for an even more dystopian feel that its emptiness did before. It’s not a fun time, that’s for sure.

WORK

Administrative work is winding down. I’m writing copious notes for the memo I’ve been working on. It’s more than I need but I’m seeing patterns and ways to edit, trim, and produce something that is readable. I hate long memos, but there’s a lot to cover, between concrete information and suggestions for improvement. And they don’t have to take my advice, I just have the responsibility to give it.

We had an Arts & Sciences Town Hall meeting on the new timetable. I will indeed be teaching in the law school (as I have for the last four years), which means I’ll start teaching in August and finishing final grading in January. At least it’s only two small-ish grad classes. Still. I really would like to know what people were smoking when they came up with the schedule. No other university is using this approach. On the other hand, the deans did finally say that we should plan our courses as if they could be taught fully online, so the default I’ve been planning is now the official one.

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20 Books of Summer

It’s June 1 and time for Cathy’s 20 Books of Summer reading challenge, one that I never manage to finish but enjoy putting together and working on. Despite giving up all reading challenges, and despite having read far fewer books at this point in the year than usual, I’m making a list.

I consulted my list from last year’s challenge, which I failed dismally, but one of the nice things about this challenge is Cathy’s emphasis that it doesn’t matter how you do it or whether you succeed, just have fun with it. I did manage to read 10 of the 20 from last year, but as Barb remarked, it was an ambitious list, and it turned out to be too ambitious. But here we go again. I’m picking a bunch of books that are half-finished (or less), some of which I’ll probably have to start over because it’s been so long; different books by authors whose books I didn’t finish last summer; and entirely new books.

Pond by Claire-Louise Bennett. I read half of this a couple of summers ago and loved it but somehow didn’t manage to finish this and am not really sure why.

Street of Thieves by Mathias Énard. I failed to read Compass last year, so I’m picking a shorter, less demanding book of his from the TBR.

In the Night of Time by Antonio Muñoz Molina. Yep, this was on the list last year. Let’s give it another go.

Occupied City by David Peace. A different Peace book than last year. This is #2 in his series of postwar Tokyo crime novels. I read the first one and thought it was brilliant (like all his books) and this has been staring at me from the bookshelf. I picked GB84 last year and failed to read it, but I can’t face that one this summer.

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